“Feminisms” – A Partnership with 516 ARTS by Wheelwright Museum

“Feminisms” – A Partnership with 516 ARTS
by: Wheelwright Museum

516 ARTS and the Wheelwright Museum team up to present an exhibition exploring feminism in its most expansive meaning, as part of the national Feminist Art Coalition initiative.

 

516 ARTS, in partnership with the Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian, presents Feminisms, an exhibition featuring artists of various cultures whose creative possibilities use the theme of feminism in its most expansive meaning. Guest curator Andrea R. Hanley (Navajo) has assembled works that are far-reaching, from a diasporic experience, the politics of body, resilience, self-determination, and land. The artists approach their process and practice in a variety of mediums, including video, performance, installation, and two- and three-dimensional works, which are all connected to current cultural, political, historical, and semiotic climates. Artists include Natalie Ball (Modoc/Klamath/Black), Dorielle CaimiDesert ArtLABApril Bojorquez (Rarámuri), Matt Garcia (Chicano), in collaboration with Shawna Shandiin Sunrise (Diné/Kewa), Angela EllsworthHaley Greenfeather English (Ojibwe), Elisa Harkins (Muscogee Creek/Cherokee), Mara Lonner, Luzene Hill (Eastern Band Cherokee), Carrie MarrillThais MatherRosemary Meza-DesPlas (Latina), Edie Tsong (Taiwanese American), and Marie Watt (Seneca Nation). The exhibition is accompanied by essays by Lucy Lippard and Andrea R. Hanley.

Hanley says, “The artists in this exhibition make strong feminist statements about who they are, their own histories, and make the viewer consider or reconsider the representation of women.”

Feminisms was developed in conjunction with a new initiative spearheaded by the Feminist Art Coalition, a national effort seeking to inspire a broad variety of exhibitions and programs across the country to centralize feminist perspectives and concerns in the cultural consciousness leading into and the year following the 2020 election. This endeavor takes feminist thought and practice as its point of departure and considers art as a catalyst for civic engagement.